Author Topic: Marking on a 1910 frame  (Read 745 times)

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pardt

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Marking on a 1910 frame
« on: January 09, 2018, 09:14:06 PM »
Here is a Interesting Marking on a 1910 currently on GB

1914mauser

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Re: Marking on a 1910 frame
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 07:27:30 AM »
It is known as the "Intertwined RW" but in fact is a split mirrored RW or MW. It is not the same as the RW found on some other Mauser arms where a intertwined RW is known to be a re-work marking but may of also been used as an inspection marking. It is a less common 1910 rear frame marking than the circled triangle and is found on .25 caliber examples in the post WWI period often accompanied by a "Germany" export marking.

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B. Mason
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aim small, mis small

vlim

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Re: Marking on a 1910 frame
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2018, 03:20:54 PM »
The marking refers to 'Werksrevision' or the factory quality control department.

This frame may have needed an additional inspection round to get it approved for the next step in production.

The way the factory operated, and the usage of these stamps, are closely linked to each other. Depending on the production number, employees were tasked with either one operation or a subset of operations. They were only to continue work (their own step) on parts that had been checked and approved by a revision committee member (QA member). If they continued work on a non-approved item, that would automatically cancel payment for the work done on that part and they would have to redo a new part at their own expense.

Normally, the parts production steps would be checked either by eye (visual inspection) or with simple go/no go gauges. If parts were no-go, but not too bad, they would pass the 'revision commission', where the part was inspected again and, if approved, was stamped with the WR marking (similar to the Erfurt RC marking) to show that it had been released for further processing. This protected the worker from any financial consequences when he continued work on such a part.

For commercial pistols, the revision (QA) would be done by a factory employee, but for military contracts the revision would be done under supervision of an army official.

It is also not unlikely that members of the 'revision commission' were also allowed to rectify small errors by reworking parts before releasing them back into the process.

This process also helps to explain the many 'worker' markings found on pistols. It's like 'signing off' one step and approving the next step to be initiated after everything so far has been within specifications.




pardt

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Re: Marking on a 1910 frame
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 05:59:10 PM »
Thank you both for the information. It's kind of cool to know that the workers got paid based off what they produced. However I am sure it was probably a little nerve wracking watching your work get inspected knowing that your income was on the line.

1914mauser

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Re: Marking on a 1910 frame
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2018, 08:06:39 AM »
Vilm,

As I brought up the other "RW" marking I would appreciate clarification of which mark you are describing or if both are known "works revision" markings? I am familiar with an RW used on HSCs that differs from this RW found on the rear frames of .25 caliber pocket pistols.

Regards,
B. Mason
NAPCA member, NRA life member
aim small, mis small