Author Topic: Unusual Mod.1910  (Read 13443 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

jcorl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 641
  • Karma: +11/-1
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Mod.1910
« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2014, 02:56:28 PM »
That was a sad thread to read.  I did not know what deactivation was.  Guess I do now.

Great photos.  Thank you for sharing.

Jim ::)
Jim

JohnS3

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 22
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Mod.1910
« Reply #16 on: March 15, 2016, 11:56:45 PM »
This very informative and as already stated, SAD!:-( Thanks for the information.
Best regards,
John

vlim

  • Trusted Contributor
  • *****
  • Posts: 349
  • Karma: +43/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Mod.1910
« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2016, 12:01:22 PM »
Interesting pistol.

Too bad it was deactivated. But is it still possible to strip the pistol to the point where the side plate can be removed?
I'm curious whether the side plate is numbered at the bottom and if there are traces of modifications on the inside.

It could be that the side plate was made for this pistol as a replacement by a competent gun smith, using a 1914 humpback side plate as a substitute piece. I've seen several examples of 1910 and 1914 pistols that had parts repaired/replaced in order to keep them going. I have a 1910 side latch with a gun smith made replacement barrel latch. Instead of the push button, it is held in place with a little screw.

b.t.w. the Mauser train was captured in Tirol, by the US Army. Not in France by the French army. The first crew to reach the train after its capture were actually British intelligence personnel. But most of the Mauser museum (and reference collection) was stored not far away from the factory in Oberndorf, and the French indeed captured Oberndorf and, sadly for us, the museum collection. Most of the collection was looted by French soldiers and many unique guns disappeared into illegality in France. Now and then, interesting guns do come out of the wood work there :)


1914mauser

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 637
  • Karma: +24/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Mod.1910
« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2016, 01:03:59 PM »
Vilm,

Thank you for the history on the Mauser train. I should know it since I may have an example that may of been on it. I would love to inspect this example in hand though I am broken hearted by the fact it has been deactivated/butchered. I believe it was made from a combination of Humpback and Sidelatch parts but by who is not certain. Even in its current condition I would love to have it in my collection.

Regards,
B. Mason
NAPCA member, NRA life member
aim small, mis small

Warbird

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 600
  • Karma: +93/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Mod.1910
« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2016, 01:18:25 PM »
Jim:  Deactivated guns in the U.S. are called "DEWATs" for DEactivated WArtime Trophies.

jcorl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 641
  • Karma: +11/-1
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Mod.1910
« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2016, 02:46:15 PM »
Thank you.  I was not aware of that term.  I just learned the other day what LGS stood for.   Local gun shop.   I thought it had more significant meaning.   I appreciate the education.   Regards,

Jim
Jim

1914mauser

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 637
  • Karma: +24/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Mod.1910
« Reply #21 on: March 17, 2016, 04:42:23 PM »
And to those who speak Mauser, LGS can stand for Low Grip Screw as in HSC.

Regards,
B. Mason
NAPCA member, NRA life member
aim small, mis small

jcorl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 641
  • Karma: +11/-1
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Mod.1910
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2016, 04:52:07 PM »
That is exactly what I thought it meant.   I speak Mauser better than Gunboards. 

Jim
Jim