Author Topic: HSc Production Chart  (Read 48841 times)

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Warbird

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #45 on: March 07, 2017, 08:24:22 PM »
Welcome aboard, Marine.  To give you any information on your HSc you will have to let me know the complete serial number.  If you are not comfortable posting it here you can give it to me in a PM (Personal Message).

USMC_Ryfleman

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #46 on: March 08, 2017, 04:26:34 AM »
Hi Warbird and thank you. The complete serial number is 833629.

Warbird

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #47 on: March 08, 2017, 07:21:36 AM »
OK ... Your HSc was produced in May 1943 and, since there are no markings on the left side of the Trigger Guard or the Fronstrap of the Grip, it is considered to be a Commercial type pistol.  That means it was not made specifically for a German military or police organization.  It was, however, probably purchased by someone in one of those organizations since ownership by an ordinary citizen was forbidden.

Since I have no idea of the condition of this pistol other than matching serial numbers, it could be anywhere from $400 to $700.  Without an original Magazine, that value may be reduced by the cost of a replacement, currently at $100 to $150.

As far as shooting it. don't forget you're dealing with an historical artifact of WWII that is almost 75 years old.  Anything breaks, it may be expensive and/or impossible to replace.  The Grips are a good example ... replacement for them would more than likely have to come out of Europe and cost more than the Magazine + international shipping.  So, if you have to shoot it, get a pair of cheap replacement Grips or, better yet, by a cheap .32 for less than the cost of a Magazine and shoot it!

Let me know if there is anything else I can help you with.  Semper Fi ... OORAH!
 

USMC_Ryfleman

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #48 on: March 08, 2017, 08:33:30 AM »
Thank you so much for such a detailed reply. I think I'll just find an original magazine and keep it in my safe as a collectable. I was definitely shocked at the price of original mags so I don't want to have to replace anything else, that's for sure!


Semper Fi!!

Kal765

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #49 on: March 19, 2017, 09:20:56 AM »
Thanks for all the great information on your forum. I have a wartime HSc that my Dad brought back from Europe, SN 712720 all numbers match. No holster or spare mag, but I do have the capture papers. The finish is probably 90-95%. The left grip has a small piece missing from the tip and I have put on a set of replacements  from Midway to prevent any more breakage. These are great little guns, fun to shoot and very accurate.
   The marks on it are: Eagle/N on right muzzle and right triggerguard, Eagle/655 on left triggerguard, and a small Eagle stamp on the left tang. Is this a 1941 model? Thanks for any help!   George

Warbird

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #50 on: March 19, 2017, 11:28:14 AM »
Hello George and Welcome.  Your Early Wartime Army HSc was produced in March 1941.  The small Eagle on the left tang is called an ATP for Army Test Proof.  The Eagle/N is the Test Firing Proof added by the German Proofhouse in Ulm, Germany to signify the firearm was safe to shoot.

Value would be between $700 and $800 with another $50 to $100 for the Capture Paper.  Anything else, let me know.

Kal765

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #51 on: March 19, 2017, 01:41:26 PM »
Thanks, Warbird!  What is the significance of the ATP? Did the Army do its own test firings or have some other acceptance standard?
Regards,  George

Warbird

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #52 on: March 19, 2017, 05:18:30 PM »
There was no known significance for the ATP other than it was a holdover from M1934 Army production marking.  The practice was discontinued after serial number 715552.

GonzoGeezer

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #53 on: April 20, 2017, 06:28:54 PM »
Hi Warbird,


I ordered the Mauser book you described in a later post. Will iT i[size=78%]nclude the data you are ising to give [/size]Production dates? If not, my HSc is 945401; I know it's early 1945, but what month

Thanks!

« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 06:30:48 PM by GonzoGeezer »
-gonzo, SoCenPA. "Before all else, be armed."  --Niccolo Machiavelli

Warbird

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #54 on: April 20, 2017, 07:41:55 PM »
Welcome to the forum GonzoGeezer.  You will find charts like this one in the book Appendix, however specific months are generated from an extensive database we maintain and other sources.  I see you picked up your latest acquisition on Still's GunBoards website.  Congratulations!

This HSc was produced in January 1945.  You described the marking as "Wehrmacht" in your other posting.  To be clear, Wehrmacht is a broad term meaning Armed Forces comprised of the Army (Heer), Navy (Kriegsmarine or KM) and Airforce (Luftwaffe).  From one of your photos, the WaA135 Acceptance Mark on your HSc is Army (Heer).

Anything else, let me know and thanks for purchasing our book!

GonzoGeezer

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #55 on: April 20, 2017, 08:11:45 PM »
Thanks for the information and clarification.  My copy of the book arrives tomorrow; I know what I'll be reading tomorrow evening!
-gonzo, SoCenPA. "Before all else, be armed."  --Niccolo Machiavelli

Edward

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #56 on: May 26, 2017, 07:31:41 PM »
I'm new to the HSc forum but am very interested in learning from you guys. I have several war time Hsc pistols and would like to know the production dates for them. Is it possible for me to download or otherwise access the chart or is it only available in the Mauser book.

Warbird

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #57 on: May 26, 2017, 08:31:24 PM »
Hello Edward!  If you open the Production Chart image in the first post of this thread, you can then save it from there.  Otherwise, you can give me the information on each of your HSc's and I will be glad to provide you with Month and Year of production.

dana

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #58 on: July 07, 2017, 12:12:05 PM »
Great chart!  Determined my HSc 7.65mm ser.#786316 was a 1942 product.  Has the eagle and I think either an "N" or an "M" on the right side of the trigger guard (UNLESS the eagle has big feet. That is possible, I suppose, as my eyes are not what they once were). Left side of trigger guard is clean. Shoots great with ball ammo; not good with other bullet shapes. Wouldn't mind finding an extra magazine for it.

Warbird

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Re: HSc Production Chart
« Reply #59 on: July 07, 2017, 12:54:10 PM »
Hi Dana and welcome!  In fact, your Commercial HSc was produced in August 1942.  The Trigger Guard marking is an Eagle/N for "Nitro" and can also be found on the right side of the Slide by the nose and on the Barrel Chamber.

You can find authentic Magazines on eBay and GunBroker.Com.  If you intend to shoot it much, get a pair of cheap Grips also since these are among the easiest to break on old guns and generally the most expensive to replace.