Author Topic: Firing the Eagle F  (Read 8165 times)

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murton

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Firing the Eagle F
« on: August 14, 2014, 12:58:18 PM »
When I first acquired it, was full of grease internally. It appeared to haven't to fired in years, if at all. Since being brought back to the States in the 40's. Cleaned out all the crud, and lubed it with Remoil.


The local farm store just got in shipment of Aguila .32 ACP's. (They told me that they haven't had any .32's, for ages.).


Took it out to the forest yesterday. Had to shoot at 7 yds, As the front sight is all but invisible at longer ranges. Ran two full mags of the Aguila's through it. Perfect function. Accuracy was also excellent. Considering the front sight is all but invisible.

Warbird

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Re: Firing the Eagle F
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2014, 02:17:08 PM »
Read somewhere that most gunfights occur at 7 yards or less so your practice distance is very appropriate.  Would you share the full serial number of your Eagle/F, is it blue or phosphate, and plastic or wood Grips?

1914mauser

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Re: Firing the Eagle F
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2014, 04:45:44 PM »
Peter, - I think this user did that in a previous post. Regards, - Burgess
B. Mason
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aim small, mis small

Warbird

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Re: Firing the Eagle F
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2014, 07:14:13 PM »
In that case, Murton would you please use the "Reply" function in the original thread and not start a new thread every time you have a thought on the same subject.  Thanks!

jcorl

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Re: Firing the Eagle F
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2014, 04:24:13 PM »
Murton,

You could not pay me enough money to fire my HSc "F".  Your gun by it's photos is far more of a collectable grade than a shooter grade.  I am happy it fired well for you, but they only made a few of these.  They may not break easy, but they do show wear and usage when fired.  Just an idea and food for thought.

Jim   
Jim

murton

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Re: Firing the Eagle F
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2014, 05:48:18 PM »
Murton,

You could not pay me enough money to fire my HSc "F".  Your gun by it's photos is far more of a collectable grade than a shooter grade.  I am happy it fired well for you, but they only made a few of these.  They may not break easy, but they do show wear and usage when fired.  Just an idea and food for thought.

Jim   




I understand where your coming from! As I have had collectable guns in the past, go south on me when shooting them.


Years ago I had a post war rework P 38 break it's locking block, when I was shooting it. I had a devil of a time just getting it apart. To replace the locking block. Contacted Warren Buxton re the locking block. Wound up sending it to him. As I recall, he told me it was probably made, (the locking block), in post 1945 Czechoslovakia. And wasn't heat treated correctly.

jcorl

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Re: Firing the Eagle F
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2014, 06:34:38 PM »
I have read that a P.38 can come apart, especially when shooting greater than the 115 grain white box ammo.  I have not read of a war era .32 HSc pulling the same trick and hope I never read of any.  I understand the same cannot be said for the post war .380 HSc.   Happy to hear your HSc fired true. 

Jim   
Jim